WHO IS CONSIDERED

DISABLED?

To determine whether you are disabled, the Social Security Administration considers several factors related to your medical condition and your ability to work. Below are the top five questions the Social Security Administration considers in determining whether you are disabled.

  1. Are you working?

If you are currently working and your average monthly earnings are above a certain amount, the Social Security Administration will deny your claim and not even review your medical conditions.  On the other hand, if you are working and your average monthly earnings are lower than a specific amount, the Social Security Administration will consider your claim and review your medical conditions, but they will also take into consideration your work activity when they are deciding whether you are disabled.

  1. Do you have medical evidence of a severe physical or mental condition?

In order to be considered disabled, a main component is proving that you have a medical condition, either physical or mental, that makes it extremely difficult to perform even the most basic tasks such as sitting, standing, walking, or concentrating and maintaining focus. If your medical condition is this severe, then you may be disabled.

  1. Is your medical condition on the list of impairments?

The Social Security Administration has created a list of impairments that includes severe medical conditions. If a person has an impairment or medical condition that is on the list, then they are automatically considered to be disabled.  For a full listing of adult impairments, click here.

  1. Can you do the work you did before?

If your condition is not on the Social Security Administration’s list of impairments, you could still be considered disabled if your medical condition or impairment prevents you from doing the same work you did before you became disabled.

  1. Can you do any other type of work?

If you cannot return to the type of work you performed before you became disabled, then the Social Security Administration has to prove that there is other work in the national economy that you can perform.  If the Social Security Administration cannot identify a significant number of jobs in the national economy that you could perform with your physical and mental abilities, then you may be disabled and eligible for benefits.

After an injury or illness, you don’t want to deal with the stressful process of applying for social security disability benefits on your own. If you or a loved one is thinking about applying for SSD or your claim has been denied, call the experienced and knowledgeable attorneys at Daggett Shuler.

If you believe that you or a loved one may have a personal legal claim, you can contact us in one of three ways:

At Daggett Shuler, you can depend on us.